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(Created page with "The complex of symptoms characterizing the disease known as radiation injury, resulting from excessive exposure (greater than 200 rads or 2 gray) of the whole body (or large p...")
 
 
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Source: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
 
Source: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
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[[Category: Chemistry]]
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Latest revision as of 20:45, 13 September 2019

The complex of symptoms characterizing the disease known as radiation injury, resulting from excessive exposure (greater than 200 rads or 2 gray) of the whole body (or large part) to ionizing radiation. The earliest of these symptoms are nausea, fatigue, vomiting, and diarrhea, which may be followed by loss of hair (epilation), hemorrhage, inflammation of the mouth and throat, and general loss of energy. In severe cases, where the radiation exposure has been approximately 1,000 rad (10 gray) or more, death may occur within two to four weeks. Those who survive 6 weeks after the receipt of a single large dose of radiation to the whole body may generally be expected to recover.

Source: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission