Difference between revisions of "Radioisotope"

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(Created page with "An unstable isotope of an element that decays or disintegrates spontaneously, emitting radiation. Approximately 5,000 natural and artificial radioisotopes have been identified...")
 
 
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Source: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
 
Source: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
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Latest revision as of 19:40, 13 September 2019

An unstable isotope of an element that decays or disintegrates spontaneously, emitting radiation. Approximately 5,000 natural and artificial radioisotopes have been identified.

Source: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission